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‘tear da roof off’

Connecticut Air National Guardsmen assigned to the 103rd Civil Engineer Squadron perform a vehicle extrication drill at Bradley Air National Guard Base, East Granby, Conn., May 14, 2011. Simulating a victim trapped inside, the Airmen use special tools to peel back the roof of the vehicle to free the victim from the wreckage. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Emmanuel Santiago)

Connecticut Air National Guardsmen assigned to the 103rd Civil Engineer Squadron perform a vehicle extrication drill at Bradley Air National Guard Base, East Granby, Conn., May 14, 2011. Simulating a victim trapped inside, the Airmen use special tools to peel back the roof of the vehicle to free the victim from the wreckage. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Emmanuel Santiago)

BRADLEY AIR NATIONAL GUARD BASE, East Granby, Conn. -- On May 14, 2011, Guardsmen assigned to the 103rd Airlift Wing's Civil Engineer Squadron performed a vehicle extrication at Bradley Air National Guard Base, East Granby, Conn. The drill consisted of the firefighters practicing how they would open a disabled vehicle to get access to the passengers.

The firefighters practiced various types of accidents like a car pinned against a tree or a guard rail, and the goal was to successfully remove different parts of the vehicle safely in order to save the lives of the victims inside.

Teamed up, the firefighters wedged the vehicle while it was on its side. This stabilization is necessary before the firefighters can start working on and in the vehicle.

Once the vehicle was stabilized, they began removing the windows and proceeded to cut the roof of the vehicle using specialized cutters made especially for these types of situations.

From the looks of the scenario, the firefighters showed a massive amount of teamwork and a great deal of concentration in order to complete the mission as quickly and safely as possible.

The training was an enjoyable experience, said Staff Sgt. Jon Branigan, firefighter, 103rd Civil Engineer Squadron, participating in the drill.

"It gets us out of the station, it's hands on, and it's better than staying in all day viewing slide shows," said Branigan.